How true is it when someone tells you that the happier you are with your physical appearance, the better your mental wellness will be? According to the Social Psychology Journal, “The self is a system of interrelated parts that collects, evaluates, and reacts to information about oneself”. Say, you have been bogged down by what your friends and close relatives have been talking about – “Your new found parasite BFF, Miss Tummy”. No matter how much you pray or stop eating, she just won’t disappear into thin air; she’s constantly staring at you right in the face, throwing a mockery or two. At the end of the day, as you lie on the bed desperately trying to fall asleep, images of people making fun of you or even as your hand moves down south to that area, these horrid images will be playing repetitively in your head like a broken record. Heck, you’ll be thinking of ways to get rid of it, and before you know it, the mockingbird sends out a loud chirping call signalling daytime. Should this occur for a couple more nights, it wouldn’t be long before you realized that you’re mentally worn out. You’re exhausted and just fed up. So, if you want a tummy tuck, breast augmentation or even a face lift, why not just go ahead? For instance, Julie Chen, a news journalist, was actually glad that she had her eyelid surgery, because it was said that she couldn’t advance in her career with Asian eyelids. Is that a gesture of giving in to the society? No – she’s truly happy right now with where she is and how she looks.  Do we need to really say the obvious? If getting bigger breasts result in you feeling more confident, then Atta Girl! If you want to get rid of the wrinkles right above your forehead, do it. At the end of the day, you are the one looking into the mirror – satisfied or not, you have the authority to change it, especially if it’s beneficial to your mental health. So if you’re physical appearance is affecting your mental health, why not? 

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